Between the Covers / Shhhh... we're reading.   Photo of reading after bedtime
Tori Woodard

Tori loves science fiction/fantasy, feminist literature, history and books on a variety of psychology topics. When she isn't reading you can find her adventuring, doing arts and crafts and playing Magic: The Gathering. She is a part-time librarian at the Sollers Point Branch.

RSS this blog

Tags

Adult

+ Fiction

+ Nonfiction

Teen

+ Fiction

   Nonfiction

Children

+ Fiction

+ Nonfiction

Author Interviews

Awards

BCPL Reading Challenge

Free Play With BCPL

In the News

New Next Week

Popcorn Reviews With BCPL

   Movies 

   TV Shows 

 

Bloggers

 


Tori

Foxlowe

posted by: May 8, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for Foxlowe"Don't go Outside. Don't let the Bad in." In Eleanor Wasserberg's debut novel we see the inner workings of Foxlowe, a commune where a group of people, who call themselves the Family, live by a different set of rules. Freya is the leader of the group, and as long as you follow her rules and listen to what she says, everything will be okay. If you break the rules, you are punished or you become a Leaver.

 

The story is presented through Green, a young girl living at Foxlowe, who Freya treats like a daughter. In the main part of the story, Green remembers what her childhood was like at Foxlowe and she recalls when Blue became a new family member and the down fall of everything. She follows and believes Freya blindly and doesn't understand the unsettling truth of who Freya really is. While much of her telling shows a beautiful and happy life, there are dark and disturbing moments throughout the story.

 

Later, Green recalls her life as an adult, where she goes by the name of Jess and lives on the Outside. She misses Foxlowe as her life is difficult and she is unsettled. Her life on the Outside is met with strange feelings and unhappy moments. Remembering the reason she no longer lives at Foxlowe, we see the deeply dark moments that have brought her to her current struggle in life.

 

Though you may be left with questions in the end, some things are better left unanswered. The mysteries of Foxlowe and what happened to everyone is intriguing and left up to the reader’s imagination in many ways. The beautiful language and point of view gives a sense of a magical and secretive world that is also dark and disturbing. Foxlowe is a captivating new story that will keep you guessing.


 
 

The Wanderers

posted by: March 13, 2017 - 7:00am

The WanderersIn Meg Howrey’s The Wanderers, the first mission to Mars is approaching. Helen, Yoshi and Sergei are a team of astronauts that want to be chosen for the mission. But first, the team must be successful in a 17–month-long simulation on Earth — proving they are the right team that is prepared for any challenges. Though the astronauts believe they are on Earth in an eerily realistic simulation, they begin to question if everything is real or not.

 

Howrey thoroughly explores the relationships of the astronauts to the people in their lives and to each other. Helen, Yoshi and Sergei demonstrate how the life choice of being an astronaut affects themselves and those around them. Helen feels that she may not have been and continues not to be the mother her daughter, Mireille, needed her to be. Dmitri, Sergei’s son, hides how he truly feels and behaves from his father. Yoshi’s wife, Madoka, believes her husband doesn’t know who she really is and that it would destroy their marriage.

 

Though this story seems very much like one about the first mission to Mars, it really isn’t at all. This is a story about humanity. It’s about the way the astronauts and the people in their lives are affected by the demanding and adventurous life of an astronaut. It’s about the urge to travel into space and what it is really like once you have been in space. Howrey’s beautiful language and view into the personal thoughts of this group of people make The Wanderers an intriguing and charming read.


 
 

Norse Mythology

posted by: February 13, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for Norse MythologyWith his fantastic capacity for storytelling, Neil Gaiman brings us the stories of the Norse gods in his new book Norse Mythology. Mr. Gaiman often draws inspiration from the Norse myths for his other books, and his love and interest in these myths is evident.

 

The book starts with some of the major “players” of Norse myths: Odin, Thor and Loki. Though these are not the only important gods, you can find them in most if not all of the stories. The beginning of the world and creation is next discussed, and we find ourselves learning how the world, the gods and humans all came about, according to the Norse. Yggdrasil, an ash tree also called the world tree, is very important to the Norse myths and connects the nine worlds. Gaiman then goes on to portray the mischief of Loki, the wisdom of Odin and the strength of Thor in his own retelling of some of his favorite myths. He tells the story of how the gods came into their treasures, and he tells the story of Loki’s children: Hel, who will be the leader of the underworld; Jormungundr, the Midgard Serpent; and Fenrir, the Fenris Wolf. My favorite of the myths in this book is when Thor, Loki and Thialfi journey to the land of the giants, and the giant Utgardaloki challenges each of their strengths. These are just of few of the amazing myths that are retold in this book.

 

From the story of Odin trading his eye for wisdom to the gods attaining their treasures to the last days of the gods at Ragnarok, Neil Gaiman will captivate you with his retelling of these myths. This quick and enchanting read will leave you with wonderful stories to tell and pass on to anyone interested in the Norse gods.


 
 

The Fifth Petal

posted by: January 25, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Fifth PetalBrunonia Barry brings us an exciting and enchanting mystery in her new book The Fifth Petal, which takes place in Salem, Massachusetts.

 

On Halloween night in 1989, a group of women gather to bless the grave of their ancestors, who were accused of witchcraft and hanged during the Salem witch trials. That night, three of the women mysteriously die, leaving Rose Whelan and Callie Cahill, the 5-year-old daughter of one of the other women, as the only survivors. Rose is convinced that a banshee murdered the women and is sent to a mental hospital. Callie is questioned and sent away, and the case grows cold.

 

On Halloween night 25 years later, a teenage boy mysteriously dies while harassing Rose, and Rose is once again convinced that the banshee is the killer. While investigating the murder of the boy, old memories and the unsolved case resurface. Tormented by the memory of that night in 1989, Callie returns to Salem to see Rose and uncover some answers for herself.

 

The mysteries of the past are unraveled as Callie begins to remember exactly what happened the night her mother and the other women died. Full of mysteries, myths and strong storytelling, The Fifth Petal is entirely captivating. Check out Brunonia Barry’s other novel, The Lace Reader, also set in Salem.


 
 

Overcoming Distractions

posted by: January 11, 2017 - 7:00am

Cover art for Overcoming DistractionsAttention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is often discussed as it pertains to children, such as how to deal with your ADHD child or how to help an ADHD student. David A. Greenwood discusses the learning disability with respect to adults in Overcoming Distractions: Thriving with Adult Attention Deficit Disorder. As someone who has the disorder himself, Greenwood talks about his start in life and all of the difficulties associated with ADHD. He was able to find a way to make his ADHD work for him and became a successful, self-employed businessman.

 

As Greenwood states, ADHD is often seen in terms of its negative aspects — those who live with it are often easily distracted, procrastinate, have a lack of organization and the tendency to be late and forget things. However, he also discusses the many positives that can be beneficial to those with ADHD, such as being creative and having the ability to “hyperfocus.” He also gives plenty of advice and tips on how to deal with the more negative aspects as well. Greenwood mentions that having a solid foundation and getting proper amounts of sleep and exercise are suggested as ways to deal with the struggles encountered with ADHD.

 

Overcoming Distractions is a well-researched, organized and easy-to-read book that offers a lot of information and advice for adults who struggle with varying types of ADHD, and even those who don’t. Though Greenwood begins with his own experiences, he also brings together information and experiences from a wide range of people who experience adult ADHD, and frequently mentions other resources that he uses himself. Adults with ADHD, may find the tips and suggestions in this book helpful.

 


 
 

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Tori