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Angelique

American Cake

posted by: November 29, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for American CakeI have always fancied myself a baker, so I couldn’t wait to dig my teeth into Anne Byrn’s American Cake: From Colonial Gingerbread to Classic Layer, the Stories and Recipes Behind More Than 125 of Our Best-loved Cakes from Past to Present. In her latest, Byrn, the best-selling author of Cake Mix Doctor (which has one of my favorite, go to cake recipes — Chocolate Kahlua Cake), not only gives you delicious recipes, but the history behind some of your favorite cakes as well.

 

The book starts with baking in America in the mid-1600s and continues through the present. Home bakers did not always have modern day appliances, but they still baked wonderful cakes. There were times when some of the ingredients were scarce and people had to improvise, which, according to Byrn, is the mark of a good baker. We learn that early cake baking was done by the wealthy because the ingredients were expensive. Each recipe comes with a brief history. Maryland’s own Smith Island Cake has an entry. There were  “war cakes” and “Depression cakes,” which were  made without eggs, sugar or butter due to unavailability or rationing. Post-World War II, fictional character Betty Crocker had a large influence on women with her cake mixes and cookbooks.

 

American Cake tells the story of our nation’s history through my favorite treat, cake. Don’t worry, you don’t have to cook over an open fire — Byrn has updated the recipes for our modern bakers. Many of these recipes will be in my baking rotation. Happy baking and more importantly, happy eating.

 


 
 

Victoria

posted by: November 22, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for Victoria the QueenIn Julia Baird’s biography, Victoria The Queen: An Intimate Biography of the Woman Who Ruled an Empire, she does not shy away from telling both the good and the bad, but being that I am a fan of the queen, I shall not speak ill of her. At the time of her death, Queen Victoria was the longest reigning English monarch. She reigned for just over 63 years — this time has become known to us as the Victorian Era.

 

When Victoria was born, she was fifth in line to the throne, but her father, the Duke of Kent, stated: “Look at her well, for she will be Queen of England.” Victoria became queen at the age of 18, at a time when most women had no power, and first British monarch to live in Buckingham Palace.

 

Queen Victoria was popular at the beginning of her reign but went in and out of favor with her people during her time on the throne. She overcame numerous attempts on her life and was key in constructing the British Empire. With her nine children and 42 great grandchildren, Queen Victoria has been dubbed “the grandmother of Europe.” Once you start this book, you will not be able to put it down as it is filled with all the hallmarks of a blockbuster — drama, intrigue and scandal. This book is a great pairing with Daisy Goodwin’s Victoria.


 
 

The Nest

posted by: May 4, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The NestThe dysfunctional Plumb family is at the center of The Nest by debut author Cynthia D’Aprix Sweeney. When we first meet Leo Plumb, the eldest and most successful sibling, he is drunk, high and speeding away from his cousin’s wedding. Leo's intoxicated state and speed result in an accident which necessitates his going into rehab. We meet the rest of the Plumb siblings as they gather to meet with Leo, who is just out of rehab. The topic of this family gathering is The Nest, their joint trust fund, which they are scheduled to receive when Melody, the youngest, turns 40. They all eagerly anticipate receiving their portion of The Nest, as they all need the money.

 

Melody has two teenage daughters who are on their way to college. She has always wanted the best for them — a house in an area they couldn't afford, private schools and Ivy League colleges. Jack Plumb runs a failing antique shop and is in debt. He also has a mortgage on the vacation home he owns with his partner of more than 20 years, Walker. Then there is Beatrice, who once was a promising writer but now works at a literary magazine. Soon, they discover The Nest is all but gone. They are all counting on Leo to get them out the financial woes they have gotten themselves into, but can he? More importantly, will he?

 

The story is told from multiple points of view, so you get insight into how each sibling feels and what secrets they are keeping from one another. If you enjoyed Meg Wolitzer’s The Interestings and Emma Straub’s The Vacationers, you will definitely want to meet the Plumb family.

 


 
 

I Kissed a Rogue

posted by: March 15, 2016 - 8:00am

Cover art for I Kissed a RogueThe first “romance” book I have read in over 20 years, Shana Galen’s I Kissed a Rogue has brought me back into the fold. It has everything I remember from my Regency romance reading days — a damsel in distress, a love-hate relationship and a rogue.

 

After being kidnapped and held captive in London’s slum, Lady Lillian-Anne (Lila), daughter of the Duke of Lennox, witnesses a murder. Her father hires Sir Brook Derring to find her, the same Brook Derring who asked Lila to marry him seven years ago. Though Lady Lila has not thought of Brook for the last seven years, he has not forgotten her and the spoiled, selfish girl she was. Brook wants nothing to do with Lila, but the Duke has enlisted the help of the king and has forced Brook’s hand. He has to marry Lila to protect her until he can find out who kidnapped her. While married and hiding out in a rundown cottage, Lila quickly falls for Brook even though she knows he wants nothing to do with her. Can Brook forgive Lila for breaking his heart all those years ago? Will Brook see Lila has changed from the girl she was and find a way to love her?

 

I Kissed a Rogue and I liked it! This is the third in the Covent Garden Cubs series, and although I did not read the first two books in this series, Earls Just Want to Have Fun and The Rogue You Know, I did not miss a beat falling right into the storyline.


 
 

The Memory of Light

posted by: March 2, 2016 - 7:00am

Cover art for The Memory of LightI have been a fan of Francisco X. Stork since I read his novel Marcelo in the Real World. In his latest novel, The Memory of Light, Victoria (Vicky) Cruz wakes up in the Lakeview Hospital psych ward not expecting or wanting to still be alive. When asked if she knows how she got there, all of the memories come flooding back —  the sleeping pills, living up to her father’s expectations, her nana leaving and her mother’s death. Vicky feels hopeless and is sure she will “try” again if she goes back home. Against her father and stepmother’s wishes, Vicky ends up staying at Lakeview for two weeks. While there, she befriends the others in her group therapy — Mona, Gabriel and E.M. — none of whom have as privileged a life as she.

 

Vicky’s father does not understand why she is so depressed since he has provided her with a good life. He feels as though she is just not trying hard enough or putting in the effort her older sister Becca has, who is studying at Harvard. In the end, Vicky finally breaks through some of her father’s anger and hurt, and they begin a slow start to building an authentic relationship.

 

The author notes that he has also struggled with depression and a suicide attempt while attending Harvard. This is a real look at what living with the illness of depression is like. This is a powerful, genuine story that will leave you cheering for Vicky and her friends. This is more than a story about suicide and depression — it is a story about loss, family, friendship and hope.

 


 
 

Find Me Unafraid

posted by: November 19, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Find Me UnafraidI have long been fascinated by the story of Jessica Posner and Kennedy Odede. I was excited when I saw Find Me Unafraid: Love, Loss, and Hope in an Africa Slum on my desk as I would finally get to hear the whole story of how they came to be by their own accounts. Previously, I have only heard snippets of their lives and what they have accomplished in Nairobi, Kenya and, more specifically, the African slum of Kibera where Kennedy grew up.

 

Kennedy Odede had a difficult life. He was born to a teen mother, homeless at one point and grew up in the worst slum in Kenya. Most would not, and never do, come out of this same situation alive let alone with a college degree and a non-profit organization, Shining Hope for Communities (SHOFCO), to help the girls of Kibera. Jessica Posner was a junior at Wesleyan University when she decided she wanted to study abroad for a semester and chose Nairobi. She heard about Kennedy and SHOFCO through two of her friends and decided to contact him about doing a theater project for his organization.

 

Their story is told in alternating chapters, a ‘he said, she said’ of how they met, fell in love and have helped and continue to help the girls of Kibera. The dream of creating the Kibera School for Girls became a reality through a grant, and in six harried weeks, it was built and continues to thrive. This story, their story, is only the beginning of what they have yet to accomplish.


 
 

Cookie Love

posted by: August 11, 2015 - 7:00am

Cover art for Cookie LoveWho doesn’t love a cookie? As a baker and lover of cookies and all things sweet, I couldn't pass up this book once I saw it on the new book shelf. Cookie Love by Mindy Segal is getting some love from the critics. It even made the Epicurious list of 30 spring cookbooks. They are excited about it, and for good reason.

 

Deliciousness abounds in eight chapters of various types of cookies, from drop to sandwich to twice baked. You'll want to bake all 60 recipes. Segal provides us with an introduction to each cookie, how she came to love it, tips for baking each cookie and information about the ingredients. As any baker knows, Segal says she never bakes a recipe just once, but rather tries to improve upon it each time. Segal is a James Beard Award-winner for Outstanding Pastry Chef, so this book is sure to please.

 

If you're looking to satisfy your sweet tooth, this is the book for you! The recipes are detailed enough that any baker new or old will be at home in the kitchen. I can’t wait to try out some of these recipes. Chunky Bars were my favorite candy bar as a child, so I'll be making Ode to the Chunky Bar very soon.

 


 
 
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